Bass Guitar Chords: Adding 3rds and 7ths

Major and Minor 3rds PDF Print E-mail

Chord Charts — Add 3rds & 7ths

There are 2 types of 3rds that you will need to learn as well. There is the Major 3rd, and the Minor 3rd. Generally, when a chord is written, and it does not specify whether it is Major (Maj) or Minor (Min), it is assumed that it is major. However, sometimes, minor chords are specified by lower case letters.

For example, in the progression: A c D E

The c chord would be minor, and the other chords would be major.

This is important because for major chords, you will want to use the Major 3rd, and likewise with minor 3rds you will want to use minor 3rds.

A Major third is found by moving one string higher (higher sounding) and one fret lower (lower sounding).

For example, if we had C as the root (which is the third fret of the A string) we would move one down to the d string (which is higher in sound) and over to the second fret and play an E on the second fret of the D string as shown in example 1.

Example 1

A minor third is found by moving one string higher (higher sounding) and two frets lower (lower sounding).

For example, if we had an A (which is on the 5th fret of the low E string) we would move one string below (or one string higher in sound to the A string) to the A String and move two frets lower in sound to the 3rd fret of the A string.

Example 1

Chord Charts (Major and Minor Thirds
Practice the following Chord Charts by adding the 3rds as well as the roots and 5ths. For each measure, play the Root, 3rd, 5th, 3rd, each as a quarternote (as applicable)

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